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Monthly Archives: October 2013

Well, well – it seems you artists and photographers have become dormant!
For those of you who take photos as a hobby, don’t be shy. Submit them to DR.
I have read countless bios from some of our favorite photographers who, only as a hobby, snap photos. So bring in those submissions! If you’re reading this and it does not apply to you (you don’t take photos, etc.), then do your friends a favor – tell them! Reblog it. Share it. Link Decades Review to all of your social media sites.

If you aren’t sure what we like, check out our most recent issue. Or, check out some of these fantastic photographers that we really enjoy – that we appreciate. We want you to appreciate them, too!

Steve McCurry

Nicola Walbeck

Submit your photography to DR. We will enjoy it. Just like always.

-Josh Hess

Hello faithful readers!

Things have been crazy (in a good way) since the release of Issue #9. Submissions have been pouring in so we’ve done nothing but read, read, read for the last couple of weeks. And we love it! There’s still plenty of time to get your submission in for Issue #10 so don’t stress; the deadline isn’t until December 15th.

With that said, the editors here at DR are just dying to be wowed by some awesome art and photography for the January issue. We recognize that creative work is real work, done by passionate people, inspired by all sorts of different things and created in a variety of places. We are not critics but rather genuinely curious observers; looking for what the artist saw and felt while painting the picture or snapping the photograph.

At DR, we want to provide a place to showcase vibrant, but under-represented artists. If your work has been featured in a plethora of magazines world-wide, that’s fantastic! We want to see it too! If you’ve never submitted to a contest or magazine before in your life, we want to draw you out of the shadows and entice you to send your work to us. We’d love to see it.

Our primary focus is on artists (and writers) who are dedicated to their craft. We are looking for people who take risks, work hard and have the guts to say, “Hey, my art is damn good and deserves to have an audience!” Decades Review wants to give you the audience that your work deserves.

By submitting your art/photography to DR not only are you considered to be awarded a featured spot in the magazine, but we also consider each piece as a potential cover image for the upcoming issue. If your work is chosen as the cover, we’ll brag about you on our Facebook page, do an interview and feature it here on the blog, and give our lovely readers the chance to get to know the artist behind the artwork.

Before submitting we recommend you give the guidelines a look. Once you’ve familiarized yourself with the guidelines, send your submission to: decadesreview@gmail.com with your last name and “photography submission” or “art submission” in the subject line. After we’ve carefully considered your piece you should hear back from us within 2-8 weeks.

If you have any questions, comments or concerns, you can email the editors at decadesreview@gmail.com. If you have a specific question for a specific editor, browse the masthead and see who you would like to direct your comment, question or concern to. We love to stay in touch with our readers and (potential) contributors.

If you’re looking for inspiration to submit to Issue #10 we are always looking for black & white photography. In addition to that, for the January Issue, we will also be considering work that centers around the color blue or a winter theme. Let your imagination run wild and surprise us! All work submitted will be considered, regardless of whether it fits one of the above preferences or not.

*We’re still looking to fill poetry, short story, and flash fiction spots for Issue #10 so keep those submissions coming!

Paige Edenfield, Poetry Editor
Decades Review

Decades Review is actively seeking works of bone-chilling flash fiction & short stories, vibrant poetry, and winter-themed photography and artwork for our January 2014 issue (10). All photography and artwork submitted will be considered for publication (winter themed or not) and the chance to appear as the next cover photo of DR. 

We publish both new and established writers.

We value clarity of image, genuine emotion, character, coherency, compression, and all the right words put in interesting combinations.

For more information, visit our submissions guidelines at:
decadesreview.com

Please send all submissions to:
decadesreview@gmail.com 

dr

On October 1st, 2013 Decades Review released our 2 year anniversary issue! As editors and writers, you think we would be able to describe everything we’re feeling with this special issue release but there are no words. We are forever grateful to our contributors for making all of this possible. You can check out Issue 9 of DR here.

The first thing you’ll see after following the “Continue Reading” link is our beautiful black & white cover photo entitled “You’ll Never See My Face,” by Nilofer Neubert. We are proud to display such a wonderful shot as the cover of our October 2013 issue and would love for you to get to know this talented photographer.

We’ve been waiting to brag on her for weeks!  Now it’s your chance to get to know Nilofer, who was kind enough to spare a moment of her time for the interview posted below.

DR: How would you describe your subject matter or the content of your work?
Nilofer Neubert: I like to capture details that capture my eye. Sometimes this can be nature, sometimes it can be people, and sometimes it’s landmarks.

 DR: What type of camera(s)/gear do you use?
 NN: Olympus Pen Lite 3.

DR: Is photography a hobby of yours or something you are pursuing professionally? What does photography mean to you?
NN: Photography is a hobby of mine. This started when I wanted to capture moments whenever I went for music gigs. I then explored other subjects to capture. I also love using photographs as a prompt for writing poetry or short stories. When I travel to new cities, I have a camera with me most of the time, looking for unique shots to capture. The result is usually a real-life picture story of my travels that I couldn’t find the words for. I use photography as a way of training myself to keep an eye out for the tiny details in every day life. I think that this process makes me a better poet/writer.

DR: What are you presently inspired by—are there things you are reading, listening to or looking at to fuel your work?
NN: These days I find myself reading the various literature magazines that are available for free on the Internet. The amount of talent that is out there is amazing. If I find a poem or story I really love, I print it out, paste it in my journal and then try to find other poems by the same poet/writer or buy the artist’s book. Sometimes, lit magazines have art/photography in them as well and I love these magazines even more because I have an interest in photography as well. Though I can’t draw or paint to save my life, I appreciate painting, drawings, murals and collages as well. Music also inspires me. Going for gigs is a huge part of my photography; I love to capture portraits of band members when they are performing. I love trying to capture their energy. (I use the word trying, mainly because high level energy bands are always challenging to capture!) 

DR: Is there something you are currently working on that you’re excited about that you would like to share?
I am the Editor of Prosaic Magazine. It’s an arts and literary magazine that aims to bring both words and graphics together. We also showcase artists and recommend various forms of art for artists. We also have columns to do with the various issues regarding art topics. Currently, I am working on my first poetry collection. So that’s really exciting and challenging at the same time.

DR: Do you have a motto or word of advice you would like to share with other budding photographers?
NN: I do not think that I am the best person to ask for advice as I am not a professional photographer. However, in my opinion, I think that when you want to capture good photographs, it is important to go with what you want to capture rather than what others want you to capture. I do not think that I would ever do a paid photo shoot mainly because photography is a hobby for me. If I turn it into my source of income, I don’t think I would capture the same kind of photographs as I do now. At the moment, I am capturing scenes that are special to me. So if you want to pursue photography, I think the first question you should ask yourself is “Who do I want to take photos for? Others so that they can look back on good memories (wedding, event, portrait photography)? Or for myself?” Once you know the answer to these questions, I think you’ll be able to figure out what photography means to you. 

One thing I have learned though is that there needs to be a balance. Sometimes I want to just live in the moment rather than capture the moment. Sometimes when I am armed with my camera, I feel that it enhances the moment. In this day and age when snapping a photo is really simple because we have the technology to do so, I think that it is important to take a step back and actually think about the issue of capturing the moment vs being in the moment. Do you want to hold on to a camera waiting for your child to take his/her first steps or would you rather have your hands free so that you can catch him/her when he/she falls? Do you want to head bang at a rock concert or would you rather capture the band’s energy? There is no right or wrong answer. However, in my opinion, thinking about these questions will help you to decide between living in the moment, capturing the moment and doing both at the same time.

DR: Are you involved in any upcoming shows or events? Where and when?
NN: Not at moment.

DR: Where can people see more of your work?
NN: 
http://blackvspurple.com or http://eyesofblackvspurple.tumblr.com

Cove Artist Nilofer Neubert

Cove Artist Nilofer Neubert

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Issue 9 is full of work that is both normal and abnormal, blissful and miserable, bright and dark. Give the current issue a read and get a taste of what all of our talented contributors have to offer.

Thanks to:

Poetry Contributors: Noel Quiñones, Scott Wiggerman, Patrick Venturella, Denny Marshall, Matthew Williams, MM Whittle, Joan McNerney, Danielle Susi.

Prose Contributors: Scott Burr and Liz Purvis.

Photographers: Carman Manu, Rebecca Wilder, Christina Jones, Emily Eason, Pat St. Pierre, Glenda York, Nilofer Neubert.

Artists: Clinton Inman and Nick Stevens.

Thank you to all who submitted for Issue 9. Don’t forget in all the excitement that we’re now reading for Issue 10. Please send submissions to: decadesreview@gmail.com

We can’t wait to see what you in store for us next!

Paige Edenfield, Poetry Editor
Decades Review